Aubrey McCormick: Big Break

Friday June 29, 2012 at 4:26 pm

1 Comment

Posted by Nicholas in Tour

Readers,

You may remember Aubrey McCormick from previous blog posts. Aubrey is a professional golfer who is working towards her lifelong goal of succeeding on the LPGA Tour. Aubrey was recently lucky enough to earn a spot on The Golf Channel’s, The Big Break. She has kindly decided to give us her behind-the-scenes account of her experience on the show:

Many people have asked me, “How do I get on the Big Break?” I’m excited to share my journey and help any fellow players who may have their sights set on competing on the Golf Channel’s Big Break series. The first step is to fill out a form online at www.golfchannel.com. They usually post the application form a few times a year. If you are selected for a second round interview, you will typically hear back within a few weeks to come to a site location and do an in-person interview while showcasing your golf talent on camera. The last step is finding out if you’ve made the show or not. Since I auditioned for the show twice prior to being chosen as a finalist, I know this process very well.

I played college golf and five years of professional golf, but there was nothing I could have done that would prepare me for my Big Break experience. From a professional stand point, the Big Break is an opportunity to showcase your talent as a golfer while shining a light on the type of person you are. From a personal standpoint, I don’t think anything shows a person’s character like being put in a situation with 11 other players, in a remote location away from family and friends, and being filmed around the clock. Each of the competitors on Big Break Atlantis were officially on stage during filming. If we didn’t perform, our destiny was elimination!

Big Break Atlantis was filmed in Paradise Island, Bahamas at the Ocean Club Golf Course. Stunning views, luscious landscapes, and crystal blue waters made this a perfect location. It was the most amazing experience of my life thus far. I had some ups and downs throughout filming and definitely felt the pressure. After spending the prior year in an office environment, it was exhilarating to feel the rush of competition again. The challenges of breaking the glass and the flop wall were fun, and winning a challenge from the bunker was even better! I enjoyed making new friends among the competitors and still talk to most of them today. I still remember LPGA star, Yani Tseng mentioning how nerve wracking the pressure was on the show. For her to say that really put things into perspective!

All in all, I encourage that anyone who believes they have what it takes to be on Big Break to apply. I am extremely happy I made it on the show and got to experience what it’s like to be under pressure, on television, and competing against some of the most talented players in the world. Just be prepared to land back in the real world once the show is over. It definitely took me a couple weeks to come down from the cloud nine of superstar treatment, an amazing location, beautiful golf courses and limelight. The sky is the limit and the Big Break will only get you closer to reaching it!

Do you think you have what it takes to make it on The Big Break?

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One Response to “Aubrey McCormick: Big Break”

  • 1
    August 06, 2012 at 3:09 am, Elva said:

    Hi CraigI live in Northern Ireland and have a handicap of 24. This is the mamxuim handicap for juniors here in Northern Ireland. I have never shot a gross score under 115.Do you think that mental practice would, or could improve my scores and eventually improve my scores? Excuse me for mentioning him, but Dr Bob Rotella has Mental tips on a certain site on the Internet, they say to accept whatever happens, I used this yesterday on the course, and didn’t let the bad shots, or holes destroy my mind, I played ok, 118 gross, 94 nett. I am pretty much convinced that mental practice is the way forward for me, when I go to the range, I hardly ever hit the sweetspot, about 50 percent of shots are ok, and less than 5 percent great. Sorry for the long message, but could you please tell me if you think mental practice is the way forward for me? Thanks,Benjamin Hegan.[]

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